Archive for February, 2011

Power Over Storms

Monday, February 28th, 2011

The Chinese dragon is a mythical animal which is connected with water and rain fall. In times of drought, government ministers used to offer sacrifices to the dragon and pray for rain. Dragons are also supposed to have power over moving bodies of water such as rip-tides, storms and tornadoes. They fly by magic and occasionally show themselves as twisters or water sprouts.

Chinese legend says a fish saw a beautiful mountain and decided to swim to the top. It fought its way upstream, struggled against rapids, overcame waterfalls and finally reached the summit. There it found the stream blocked by a locked gate. Undaunted, the fish jumped over the gate and was immediately transformed into a dragon. Thus an ordinary fish can turn into a dragon if it tries hard enough. (Many waterfalls in China are named Dragon’s Gate).


This is an excerpt taken from “China Land of Dragons and Emperors” by Adeline Yen Mah. This book is available as a free PDF download when you subscribe to Adeline Yen Mah’s free Chinese Character A Day Chinese Language and History Lessons. To do so, you may click here.

Enter The Dragon

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

Let’s start before recorded history in the mythical times when dragons were supposed to exist. They were said to have the eyes of a demon and the claws of an eagle. They were associated with power over water, with the lucky number nine and with royalty.


This is an excerpt taken from “China Land of Dragons and Emperors” by Adeline Yen Mah. This book is available as a free PDF download when you subscribe to Adeline Yen Mah’s free Chinese Character A Day Chinese Language and History Lessons. To do so, you may click here.

Three World-Changing Inventions

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

Francis Bacon, the English philosopher known as the `Father of the Scientific Revolution’, wrote in 1620 that there were three world-changing inventions: printing, gun-powder and the compass. The first transformed literature, the second warfare, and the third navigation.

He died without knowing that all three had come from China.

Presently, one-fifth of the world’s population is Chinese, totaling over 1300 million people. There are more Chinese learning English than all the native English speakers on earth. One day China could become the number one English-speaking nation as well as the world’s largest manufacturer and consumer. Perhaps it is time to know something about China.

This is an excerpt taken from “China Land of Dragons and Emperors” by Adeline Yen Mah. This book is available as a free PDF download when you subscribe to Adeline Yen Mah’s free Chinese Character A Day Chinese Language and History Lessons. To do so, you may click here.